Philosopher; lover; scoundrel; mad man with a box, without a box.

KBO

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I shaved the other day. Thinking I’m gonna stay smooth for a while.

:)

:)

Daughters asked me “what’s a sex tape?” It took me a while to realise that what was confusing them was the word “tape”.
truedetectivequotes:

Martin Hart: Shit, man, look, I’ve noticed you have a tendency toward myopia, tunnel vision… blows investigations… vision skews, twists evidence. You’re… You’re obsessive.
Rustin Cohle: You’re obsessive too, just not about the job.
Martin Hart: Not me, brother. I keep things… even, separate. Like the way I can have just one beer without needing 20.
Rustin Cohle: People incapable of guilt usually do have a good time.



Incidentally, I love that he says guilt and not shame here. It’s a core difference. People who don’t feel guilt feel shame instead. Guilt is, “I did something bad” and implies that good things can be done instead; Shame is, “I am bad” and is a tonic against change. People incapable of guilt do tend to have a good time — they just punish themselves  with a bit of shame after, and carry on going.

truedetectivequotes:

Martin Hart: Shit, man, look, I’ve noticed you have a tendency toward myopia, tunnel vision… blows investigations… vision skews, twists evidence. You’re… You’re obsessive.

Rustin Cohle: You’re obsessive too, just not about the job.

Martin Hart: Not me, brother. I keep things… even, separate. Like the way I can have just one beer without needing 20.

Rustin Cohle: People incapable of guilt usually do have a good time.



Incidentally, I love that he says guilt and not shame here. It’s a core difference. People who don’t feel guilt feel shame instead. Guilt is, “I did something bad” and implies that good things can be done instead; Shame is, “I am bad” and is a tonic against change. People incapable of guilt do tend to have a good time — they just punish themselves with a bit of shame after, and carry on going.
Imagine in the year 1000 you didn’t understand “industry,” but knew it was coming, would be powerful, and involved iron and coal. You might then have pictured a blacksmith inventing and then forging himself an industry, and standing in a city square waiving it about, commanding all to bow down before his terrible weapon. Today you can see this is silly — industry sits in thousands of places, must be wielded by thousands of people, and needed thousands of inventions to make it work.

Similarly, while you might imagine someday standing in awe in front of a super intelligence that embodies all the power of a new age, superintelligence just isn’t the sort of thing that one project could invent. As “intelligence” is just the name we give to being better at many mental tasks by using many good mental modules, there’s no one place to improve it. So I can’t see a plausible way one project could increase its intelligence vastly faster than could the rest of the world.

Overcoming Bias : I Still Don’t Get Foom One of those cases where I’m really not qualified to weigh in one side or the other of the debate really, but the analogy is a good one for framing the subject, I think. I don’t think there’s always enough appreciation of what “intelligence” is, or what an “intelligence project” would entail. People look at the information technology available today, and say, “Wow, surely we must have one super-powerful piece of computing coming up down the road!” but don’t explain why it’s going to be some single, unified, cellular thing. Even the most powerful computers, as far as I understand them, are a powerful interplay of many different projects going on, mediated by human actors trying to ply something from them.

Reminds me of the Binswanger quote that a computer can’t “think” anymore than a calculator can. It’s not to undermine the power or possibility for future innovation into a thinking machine, but just to point out that our current “artificial intelligence” aren’t things sitting on their own, intelligent in their own right, on their own, as just a thinking, exploring, concepting device, with its own moral* teleology. (*Moral: in the sense of having a concept of one’s own life, one’s own value, and the intellectual, physical and other means necessary to pursue that life)

My order from Motive Power Supply (ablogforlivingonearth) arrived. Thanks chaps!

My order from Motive Power Supply (ablogforlivingonearth) arrived. Thanks chaps!

deep-dark-fears:

A fear submitted by Lisa Lemonshoos to deep dark fears.

This picture is horrifying.

deep-dark-fears:

A fear submitted by Lisa Lemonshoos to deep dark fears.

This picture is horrifying.

emmafred:

Advice from Katie West.

emmafred:

Advice from Katie West.

(via therealkatiewest)

baby-youre-a-rich-man:

MY FRIENDS NEED TO STOP GETTING MAD AT ME WHENEVER I MAKE BEATLES REFERENCES
DUDES, JUST LET IT BE

littleprincessaubrey:

lol

Dr. Samuel Johnson: [places two manuscripts on the table, but picks up the top one] Here it is, sir. The very cornerstone of English scholarship. This book, sir, contains every word in our beloved language.

Blackadder: Every single one, sir?

Dr. Samuel Johnson: Every single word, sir!

Blackadder: Oh, well, in that case, sir, I hope you will not object if I also offer the Doctor my most enthusiastic contrafribularities.

Dr. Samuel Johnson: What?

Blackadder: “Contrafribularites”, sir? It is a common word down our way.

Dr. Samuel Johnson: Damn!

[writes in the book]

Blackadder: Oh, I’m sorry, sir. I’m anispeptic, frasmotic, even compunctuous to have caused you such pericombobulation.

(Source: thenewmetropolitan, via xenoshock)

  • Celine: Baby, you are gonna miss that plane.
  • Jesse: I know.
(via Penny Arcade - The Talk, By Mike Krahulik)

In the real world, the realest one we have at any rate, Gabriel the Younger joined his friends in ridiculing a boy who did not understand procreation. Except he didn’t understand it either. Understand that conversations like this happen in Minecraft, now. So he asked his Dad, who I know well. And his dad had no idea how he was going to do it, much like our own dads, who simply never told us anything. Except there’s no way you can get away with that anymore. I have probably been too frank at home, honestly. It’s a problem I have: I hate lies. It has made this job increasingly difficult. But I would rather that they know something too early than not at all, or to let some malefactor define these things toward their own purpose. I would never say that I was better at this than Gabriel the Elder. Until recently there was an active rivalry, but I am currently the worst father in this galaxy - just beating out the malevolent Husk-Ship Armogedra. But my son does know what his dick is about, on account of a policy called Facts By Five. He listened in ever crystallizing horror until everything seemed to coalesce for him, he said “Okay,” and finished building his robot; a robot now studded with brutal, gas-powered chain-dongs.

(via Penny Arcade - The Talk, By Mike Krahulik)

In the real world, the realest one we have at any rate, Gabriel the Younger joined his friends in ridiculing a boy who did not understand procreation. Except he didn’t understand it either. Understand that conversations like this happen in Minecraft, now. So he asked his Dad, who I know well. And his dad had no idea how he was going to do it, much like our own dads, who simply never told us anything. Except there’s no way you can get away with that anymore.

I have probably been too frank at home, honestly. It’s a problem I have: I hate lies. It has made this job increasingly difficult. But I would rather that they know something too early than not at all, or to let some malefactor define these things toward their own purpose.

I would never say that I was better at this than Gabriel the Elder. Until recently there was an active rivalry, but I am currently the worst father in this galaxy - just beating out the malevolent Husk-Ship Armogedra. But my son does know what his dick is about, on account of a policy called Facts By Five. He listened in ever crystallizing horror until everything seemed to coalesce for him, he said “Okay,” and finished building his robot; a robot now studded with brutal, gas-powered chain-dongs.
Sometimes you wake up. Sometimes the fall kills you. And sometimes, when you fall, you fly.
All the time, I was telling myself, just enjoy it for what it is, don’t be weird, don’t get all screwed up over something it isn’t. The usual mantra when you’re with someone who you’re not really with and desperately want to be.

Have you noticed how telling yourself all that shit never actually helps?
This is precisely what worries me about the home cinema theory - that is, the belief that cinemas will die out, because home cinema systems are so good. I’m sorry, but unless you have >20 foot screen at your home, you’re not watching real cinema. You’re missing out on the sheer expansive nature of cinema. Not to mention the power of a large sound system in an auditorium, or that intangible nature of being surrounded by strangers experiencing the same moment.
[Edit] Ok, just got to the end of the book. Gonna quote some paragraphs coz they’re so good:
At home, you are king, and the television is your jester. If you are not amused, you take out the remote control and chop off his head! The framework of home viewing is familiarity: What is right is what fits with the routine, which implies a mind-set that sees only what it wants - is prepared - to see.
Going out, however, involves some expense, inconvenience, and risk. Remember that you will be sitting in a dark room with as few as six, or as many as six hundred strangers. No distractions, no way to stop the film once it starts, and it starts at a certain time whether or not you are there.I just want to interrupt to say this fits with something I’ve been puzzling over a lot lately, thinking about obsessive-compulsive behaviour, narcissism (two traits I’m victim to, though not pathologically so, thank god) and just generally the self-vs-the-other: that a happy life requires a recognition and a place in your life for accepting that which is out of your control, for appreciating things that exist outside of you — the most vital and uncontrollable of these being other people.

Also, as a more trivial example, I often listen to playlists on 8tracks, or search for a song by keyword on Spotify and listen to everything else that comes up to - I like the exposure and the way it’s an experience out of my control. It’s something I’m having to adapt my mind to, not something adapting and existing according to my present judgement.
This produces a mind set that is open to experience in a way that home viewing can never replicate. Most mysteriously important, however, are those six or six hundred strangers sitting with you, whose muffled presence alters and magnifies the nature of what you see in an unquantifiable way.
Let’s say that the average age in the audience is twenty-five years. Six hundred times twenty-five equals fifteen thousand years of human experience assembled in that darkness — well over twice the length of recorded human history of hopes, dreams, disappointments, exultation, tragedy. All focused on the same series of images and sounds all brought there by the urge, however inchoate, to open up and experience as intensely as possible, something beyond their ordinary lives.

This is precisely what worries me about the home cinema theory - that is, the belief that cinemas will die out, because home cinema systems are so good. I’m sorry, but unless you have >20 foot screen at your home, you’re not watching real cinema. You’re missing out on the sheer expansive nature of cinema. Not to mention the power of a large sound system in an auditorium, or that intangible nature of being surrounded by strangers experiencing the same moment.



[Edit] Ok, just got to the end of the book. Gonna quote some paragraphs coz they’re so good:
At home, you are king, and the television is your jester. If you are not amused, you take out the remote control and chop off his head! The framework of home viewing is familiarity: What is right is what fits with the routine, which implies a mind-set that sees only what it wants - is prepared - to see.

Going out, however, involves some expense, inconvenience, and risk. Remember that you will be sitting in a dark room with as few as six, or as many as six hundred strangers. No distractions, no way to stop the film once it starts, and it starts at a certain time whether or not you are there.
I just want to interrupt to say this fits with something I’ve been puzzling over a lot lately, thinking about obsessive-compulsive behaviour, narcissism (two traits I’m victim to, though not pathologically so, thank god) and just generally the self-vs-the-other: that a happy life requires a recognition and a place in your life for accepting that which is out of your control, for appreciating things that exist outside of you — the most vital and uncontrollable of these being other people.

Also, as a more trivial example, I often listen to playlists on 8tracks, or search for a song by keyword on Spotify and listen to everything else that comes up to - I like the exposure and the way it’s an experience out of my control. It’s something I’m having to adapt my mind to, not something adapting and existing according to my present judgement.
This produces a mind set that is open to experience in a way that home viewing can never replicate. Most mysteriously important, however, are those six or six hundred strangers sitting with you, whose muffled presence alters and magnifies the nature of what you see in an unquantifiable way.

Let’s say that the average age in the audience is twenty-five years. Six hundred times twenty-five equals fifteen thousand years of human experience assembled in that darkness — well over twice the length of recorded human history of hopes, dreams, disappointments, exultation, tragedy. All focused on the same series of images and sounds all brought there by the urge, however inchoate, to open up and experience as intensely as possible, something beyond their ordinary lives.